Italian penury: How much of Paul Pogba can the poorest Italians buy?

The number of people living in absolutely poverty in Italy has risen to its highest point since 2005, with 7.6% of the population affected.

Statistical body Instat said that 4.6 million people were now unable to afford goods and services “essential to avoid grave forms of social exclusion”.

Migrant children play on a sports field on the premises of the Sant'Antonio Parish in Ventimiglia, Italy, 08 July 2016

Migrant children play on a sports field on the premises of the Sant’Antonio Parish in Ventimiglia, Italy, 08 July 2016

Poverty levels are now at their highest point since records were first compiled in 2005. In the less-developed south, 10% of people live in absolute poverty.

Italian media said some of the change could be attributed to migrant families, almost a third of whom live in absolute poverty – more than 153,000 migrants arrived in Italy last year.

Instat distributed figures breaking down what constituted absolute poverty across the country.

So how poor is poor?

We broke down the figures relative to the cost of footballer Paul Pogba, the star of Turin-based club Juventus. He is reported to be on the move for a world record fee of £100m (€120m; $133m).

A single person in southern Italy would earn 0.00046% of Pogba's quoted transfer fee in a month - maybe enough to afford part of his fingernail

A single person in southern Italy would earn 0.00046% of Pogba’s quoted transfer fee in a month – maybe enough to afford part of his fingernail

Paul Pogba of France reacts after the UEFA EURO 2016 final match between Portugal and France at Stade de France in Saint-Denis, France, 10 July 2016.

A family of four in Rome earns 0.0012% of Pogba’s quoted transfer fee a month, which may be enough to own that crease in his forehead

Massimiliano Dona, secretary of the National Consumers’ Union, called the poverty figures “a national disgrace” which showed the government had “not done anything to reduce inequalities and help those most in need”, La Repubblica reported.

Economy Minister Pier Carlo Padoan told the Ansa news agency the government was committed to bringing more people out of poverty, but that the financial situation it now faced was the most severe in 20 years.

Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was appointed in 2014 after a promise to bring life back into the economy, but little improvement has been seen.

He is also facing pressure over a referendum he has called for later this year to cut the powers of the Italian Senate as part of a series of planned constitutional reforms.

Mr Renzi has promised to resign if he loses the vote.




Loading...


181 Total Views 1 Views Today

By Sydney Chesterfield on July 14, 2016 · Posted in Reports, Sports, Trends

Sorry, comments are closed on this post.